Thursday, September 13, 2018

SHREVEPORT SIZZLERS: OUR CITY’S SONGS (1928-1985)



SHREVEPORT SIZZLERS: OUR CITY’S SONGS (1928-1985)
Compiled in December 2008, liner notes revised September 2018.

Songs about Shreveport, songs recorded in Shreveport, songs by Shreveporters, songs on Shreveport record labels.

Listen online: https://www.mixcloud.com/shreveportsongs/4-shreveport-sizzlers-our-citys-songs-1928-1985/


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1 SHREVEPORT SIZZLERS Nervous Breakdown (Okeh 41561, circa 1932)
In the early 1930s, Okeh released two records by the Shreveport Sizzlers. These were actually re-releases of recordings previously issued in 1929 on Columbia by Clarence Williams’ Jazz Kings. Williams was a blues and jazz pioneer from New York by way of Chicago and New Orleans.

2 TAYLOR-GRIGGS LOUISIANA MELODY MAKERS Big Ball Uptown (Victor 21768, 1928)
Hailing from Arcadia, this group regularly performed around North Louisiana and broadcast over radio station KWKH. Containing two Taylors and five Griggs, it was a combined family affair.

3 JOE SHELTON Match Box Blues (Decca 5177, 1935)
After leaving the Lone Star Cowboys, Bob and Joe Attlesey began performing and recording as the Shelton Brothers. In this song popularized by Blind Lemon Jefferson, they interject a reference to Bossier City, which is located across the Red River from Shreveport.

4 OSCAR WOODS (THE LONE WOLF) Evil Hearted Woman Blues (Decca 7904, 1936)
Woods comprised half of the Shreveport Home Wreckers, played guitar on Jimmie Davis’s early recordings, and recorded with the Wampus Cats. Here’s one of his solo recordings.

5 MODERN MOUNTAINEERS Bad Blues (Bluebird 7671, 1937)
This Houston group relocated to Shreveport in 1937 to work for KWKH. It was a short-lived arrangement, but the experience lasted long enough to influence the lyrics to this song.

6 BOOTS DOUGLAS AND HIS BUDDIES ORCHESTRA East Commerce Stomp (Bluebird 10036, 1938)
Hailing from San Antonio, B&HB regularly toured to Shreveport in the late 1930s. They even snagged a musician from our city – trumpeter Sam Player – who can be heard on this song.

7 NOAH MOORE Jerry's Saloon Blues (1940)
Jerry’s Saloon on Texas Avenue and the moving picture show are places to avoid if you’re Moore’s woman. A relative of Lead Belly, Moore recorded this in Oil City for John Lomax, who was visiting town collecting songs.

8 HARMIE SMITH AND THE SOUTHERN SWINGSTERS Weary Trouble on My Mind (RCA-Victor 20-1996, 1945)
Having performed on radio stations in West Virginia, Smith migrated to Shreveport where he played on KWKH and was an original member of the Louisiana Hayride. For this recording, his band features both Webb Pierce and Owen Perry on guitar.

9 PEE WEE HUGHES AND THE DELTA DUO Shreveport Blues (1949)
Hughes recorded four songs in New Orleans, though only two were released at the time. They appeared on a 78 for DeLuxe Records. Here’s one of the unreleased songs.

10 ZEKE CLEMENTS Louisiana (MGM 10552, 1949)
Clements worked for many radio programs around the country over the years. From 1948-1950 he hosted radio shows on KWKH and performed on the Louisiana Hayride. He’s also known for providing the voice of Bashful in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

11 CAROL WILLIAMS Just For Awhile (RAM 100, circa 1955)
A number of firsts: the first release on Mira Smith’s RAM label, the first record for Carol Williams, and the first recording to feature James Burton. Williams married another Shreveporter, Billy Sanford, who went on to become a session guitarist in Nashville.

12 MAYLON HUMPHRIES Worried 'Bout You Baby (1957)
Though Humphries recorded this song over five times (including for Chess Records), it remained unissued until the mid-1970s. His pal, James Burton, plays guitar on this Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup tune. Humphries later cut 45s under the name Maylon D. Witt.

13 GEORGE JONES Nothing Can Stop My Loving You (1958)
Jones was a Louisiana Hayride member from 1955-1956, then he returned for a few shows in 1958. This live recording is from the latter period and includes an introduction by Faron Young.

14 THE FAIRLANES Johnny Rhythm (Lucky Seven 102, 1959)
Here’s a song from this vocal group’s first 45, which was released on a short-lived label operated by Dee Marais and Shelby Singleton. One member, Charles Pennywell, went on to cut a 45 for Smash Records in 1963 and is still performing these days in Las Vegas.

15 JERRY AND BRAD The People Hater (Shad 5009, 1959)
J&B regularly appeared on the Louisiana Hayride during the fall of 1959. Brad Ingles had been performing on the program since 1957 as a member of the Four B’s. The other half of this duo is likely to be Jerry Kennedy.

16 THE FIVE JETS The Shake (Jewel 739, 1964)
This group hailed from Alabama and regularly performed on the Bossier Strip at the Sho-Bar in the 1960s. Dale Hawkins produced this record.

17 JERI WILSON The Tease (Part 1 and 2) (Red River 101, circa 1965)
The songwriting credit and the publishing information on this record reveal Jesse Thomas’s involvement. In fact, he even released the record on his own label. It seems likely that he’s also the one playing guitar on this song.

18 DON & JERRY WITH THE FUGITIVES In the Cover of Night (Fabor 140, 1965)
Primarily known as songwriters, Don Griffin and Jerry Strickland perform on this record. In the early 1970s, Strickland worked with Bobby Patterson to write and produce songs for the Paula label. He also co-founded two Shreveport labels: Soul Power and Alarm.

19 JERRY MCCAIN 728 Texas (Where The Action Is) (Jewel 753, 1965)
After spending over 10 years cutting records for a variety of labels, McCain hooked up with Stan Lewis for five 45s. The title of this instrumental references Lewis’s record shop address. “728...Don’t Be Late!”

20 NAT STUCKEY Paralyze My Mind (Paula 243, 1966)
East Texan Nat Stuckey joined the Louisiana Hayride during its later years. He signed with Stan Lewis’s Paula Records and became the label’s most prolific country musician. Be sure to listen for the reference to Kelly’s Truck Stop, which was located west of town on I-20.

21 ABE & MARION ESTER AND THE CASANOVAS That's Why I'm So Sad (Murco 1036, 1967)
Recording with a group as well as solo, the Esters were two of Murco’s most active musicians. This song comes from their first 45 and features Marion on vocals.

22 NOEL ODOM & THE GROUP Pardon My Complete Objection (Uptown 763, 1969)
Having performed at high school dances, teen clubs, and the Bossier Strip, this group travelled to Memphis to record their first record at the Sam C. Phillips Recording Studio. They went on to release two additional 45s.

23 REUBEN BELL What's Happening To The World (House of Orange 2403, 1971)
After recording for Murco in the late 1960s, Bell hooked up with Allen Orange’s label in Nashville. This topical soul ballad was co-written with Geater Davis.

24 BOBBY PATTERSON Right On, Jody (Paula 352, 1972)
Coming from Dallas, Patterson was hired in the early 1970s as an A&R man for Stan Lewis’s Jewel Record Inc. He also got involved with the Sound City recording studio and began recording for Lewis. This song, from his first Paula 45, contains the songwriting credits of three other locals: Jerry Strickland, Jerry Beach, and Reuben Bell.

25 HUMMINGBEES OF SHREVEPORT I'm Not Tired Yet (Memorial 1-4, 1973)
Don Logan, long-time KEEL DJ and Vice President of Sales at Stan Lewis’s Jewel Record Inc., founded a gospel record label in the 1970s. Here’s one of the few local groups to have a release on Memorial.

26 GAY POPPA Mercy Baby (Custom Sound 1007, circa 1975)
Sonrose Rutledge (aka Gay Poppa) began DJ’ing for KOKA in 1963 and later worked as the station’s manager. Here’s a song from his one and only record.

27 E. T. S'port City Rock (De-Pact 317, circa 1985)
Behind the abbreviated moniker is Earl Turner. Disco-funk recorded at Southern Star Studio. Turner still performs and is based out of Las Vegas.

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Stan Lewis on "Art of the Insane" radio show (December 12, 2006)



Stan Lewis on "Art of the Insane" radio show
December 12, 2006
Hosted by Chris Brown
KSCL 91.3 FM (Shreveport, Louisiana).

Listen online: https://www.mixcloud.com/shreveportsongs/stan-lewis-on-art-of-the-insane-radio-show-kscl-913-fm-december-12-2006/


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Track listing:
[00:05:55] LOWELL FULSON - Reconsider Baby (Checker 804, 1954)
[00:18:10] JIMMY LEE AND WAYNE WALKER - Love Me (Chess 4863, 1955)
[00:21:55] DALE HAWKINS - Susie Q (1956 demo)
[00:24:15] DALE HAWKINS - Four Letter Word (Checker 843, 1956)
[00:31:20] BOBBY CHARLES - Everyone Knows (Jewel 728, 1964)
[00:38:00] JERRY MCCAIN - 728 Texas (Where The Action Is) (Jewel 753, 1965)
[00:44:15] LIGHTNIN' HOPKINS - Uncle Stan, The Hip Hit Record Man (Jewel 825, 1972)
[00:56:35] THE PLAYBOYS - Boogie Children (Jewel 737, 1965)
[01:04:30] THE UNIQUES - Run And Hide (Paula 245, 1966)
[01:11:05] TOUSSAINT MCCALL - Nothing Takes The Place Of You (Ronn 3, 1967)
[01:20:45] CARTER BROTHERS - Booze In The Bottle (Jewel 754, 1965)
[01:31:05] AFRICAN MUSIC MACHINE - Black Water Gold (Pearl) (Soul Power 109, 1972)
[01:44:45] FIVE BY FIVE - 15 Going On 20 (Paula 326, 1970)
[01:53:20] THE UNIQUES - All These Things (Paula 238, 1966)

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

SHREVEPORT FAREWELL: OUR CITY’S SONGS (1902-1977)



SHREVEPORT FAREWELL: OUR CITY’S SONGS (1902-1977)
Compiled in December 2007, liner notes revised June 2018.

Songs about Shreveport, songs recorded in Shreveport, songs by Shreveporters, songs on Shreveport record labels.

Listen online: https://www.mixcloud.com/shreveportsongs/3-shreveport-farewell-our-citys-songs-1902-1977/



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1 CLIMAX BAND Cottonfield Capers (Climax K12, circa 1902)
2 RAMBLIN’ THOMAS Jig Head Blues (Paramount 12708, 1928)
3 BLIND ANDY Hello World Song (Don't You Go ‘Way) (Hello World 001, 1930)
4 MISSISSIPPI SHEIKS Sitting On Top Of The World (Okeh 8784, 1930)
5 PELICAN WILDCATS Walkin' Georgia Rose (Columbia 15755-D, 1931)
6 LITTLE BROTHER Shreveport Farewell (Bluebird 10953, 1936)
7 BUDDY JONES Butcher Man Blues (Decca 5703, 1939)
8 KITTY GRAY AND HER WAMPUS CATS I Can't Dance (Got Ants in My Pants) (Vocalion 03992, 1937)
9 THE SUNSHINE BOYS She's A Rounder (Okeh 06540, 1941)
10 BAILES BROS. Whiskey Is the Devil (In Liquid Form) (Columbia 37583, 1947)
11 COUNTRY JIM Avenue Breakdown (Imperial 5062, 1950)
12 TEX GRIMSLEY AND HIS TEXAS SHOWBOYS Walking The Dog (Pacemaker HB 1001, 1951)
13 DAVID “PETE” MCKINLEY Shreveport Blues (Gotham 505, 1950)
14 JOHNNY CASH So Doggone Lonesome and Southern Maid Commercial (1956)
15 THE MONTCLAIRS All I Want Is Love (Sonic ER104, 1956)
16 GENE WYATT Lover Boy (Ebb 123, 1957)
17 LINDA BRANNON I'm Leavin’ (RAM 11829, 1958)
18 THE BROTHERS Lazy Susan (Argo 5318, 1958)
19 BANNY PRICE There Goes The Girl (Jewel 733, 1964)
20 JIMMY & STAN Tahiti (Murco 1025, 1962)
21 ALEX SNOOK JONES For My Worst (Blue Boy 1001, circa 1965)
22 THE IN-CROWD Nothing You Do (Ronn 1, 1966)
23 EDDIE “G” GILES AND THE JIVE 5 Eddy's Go-Go Train (Murco 1034, 1967)
24 NORMA DRAGOO Nightmare (Custom Sound 142, circa 1970)
25 ABRAHAM Funky Spider And Scared Fly (Hy Sign 3514, 1973)
26 TED TAYLOR Ghetto Disco (Alarm 117, 1977)
27 SMITH BROTHERS Pack Up (circa 1965)
28 W. K. (OLD MAN) HENDERSON Hello World (Hello World 001, 1930)

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1 CLIMAX BAND Cottonfield Capers (Climax K12, circa 1902)
In the 1890s, William Christopher O’Hare served as the first music director of Shreveport’s Grand Opera House, taught music lessons, and composed and arranged music. He composed and dedicated this piece to the “March King,” John Philip Sousa, whose orchestra had performed and would later record other O’Hare compositions.

2 RAMBLIN’ THOMAS Jig Head Blues (Paramount 12708, 1928)
Older brother of Logansport/Shreveport bluesman, Jesse Thomas. Lyrics mention the “Dirty Thirty,” a cluster of homes once standing next to the railroad tracks behind the Calanthean Temple on Texas Avenue.

3 BLIND ANDY Hello World Song (Don't You Go ‘Way) (Hello World 001, 1930)
The prolific “Blind Andy” Jenkins recorded this song for (and about) KWKH’s owner, W. K. Henderson. He sings about subjects Henderson loved to hate – chain stores and the Federal Radio Commission (forerunner to the FCC). This song was paired on a record with a Henderson rant (see track 28).

4 MISSISSIPPI SHEIKS Sitting On Top Of The World (Okeh 8784, 1930)
Having traveled from central Mississippi, this group participated in Shreveport’s first commercial recording session. The song became widely popular, and was performed by other country and blues musicians.

5 PELICAN WILDCATS Walkin' Georgia Rose (Columbia 15755-D, 1931)
Hailing from Pelican, a town 50 miles south of Shreveport, the Wildcats performed at social functions throughout the region as well as on Shreveport radio stations KRMD, KWEA, and KWKH.

6 LITTLE BROTHER Shreveport Farewell (Bluebird 10953, 1936)
Eurreal Wilford “Little Brother” Montgomery was raised in Kentwood, La., and performed throughout South Louisiana and Mississippi before moving to Chicago. Here’s his instrumental tribute to our city.

7 BUDDY JONES Butcher Man Blues (Decca 5703, 1939)
Jones was a one-time member of the Pelican Wildcats, pal of Jimmie Davis, Shreveport policeman, and musician with a penchant for risqu̩ hillbilly blues. The lyrics include references to two communities south of town РCedar Grove and Forbing.

8 KITTY GRAY AND HER WAMPUS CATS I Can't Dance (Got Ants in My Pants) (Vocalion 03992, 1937)
This group includes Oscar Woods on guitar (who recorded with Jimmie Davis in the 1930s). It is presumed that Davis helped them get into the studio and onto record.

9 THE SUNSHINE BOYS She's A Rounder (Okeh 06540, 1941)
The Shelton Brothers adopted this group name for their performances on KWKH as well as their recordings for Okeh Records. Though their lineup changed over the years, Jimmie Davis hired them to be his backing band while campaigning for governor in the 1940s.

10 BAILES BROS. Whiskey Is the Devil (In Liquid Form) (Columbia 37583, 1947)
Hailing from West Virginia, the Bailes Brothers were hired by KWKH and helped establish the Louisiana Hayride. They performed sacred songs, but were notorious for their profane lifestyle. Their move to Shreveport was triggered by their dramatic termination from the WSM radio station and the Grand Ole Opry.

11 COUNTRY JIM Avenue Breakdown (Imperial 5062, 1950)
James Bledsoe (aka Country Jim) recorded four 78s for Imperial. He also recorded over a dozen unreleased songs which included such Shreveport street-themed titles as “Texas Street Blues” and “Travis Street Blues.”

12 TEX GRIMSLEY AND HIS TEXAS SHOWBOYS Walking The Dog (Pacemaker HB 1001, 1951)
Grimsley played and crafted fiddles since childhood, was recognized as the Louisiana State Fiddling Champion four times, and his band played on the debut Louisiana Hayride show. This song appeared on the first record issued by Shreveport’s Pacemaker Records, which was founded by Webb Pierce and Hayride announcer Horace Logan.

13 DAVID “PETE” MCKINLEY Shreveport Blues (Gotham 505, 1950)
One of two songs McKinley recorded for this Philadelphia record label. Two years later, he recorded (at a late night KWKH studio session) over half a dozen songs for a Los Angeles label. It has been suggested that Stan Lewis was connected to McKinley’s recordings.

14 JOHNNY CASH So Doggone Lonesome and Southern Maid Commercial (1956)
Live from the Louisiana Hayride, Cash sings a song from his second record and discusses the finer points of Southern Maid Donuts.

15 THE MONTCLAIRS All I Want Is Love (Sonic ER104, 1956)
One of Shreveport’s few recorded contributions to the doo-wop genre. Features Chico Chism on drums.

16 GENE WYATT Lover Boy (Ebb 123, 1957)
Rockabilly with a young James Burton on guitar. The songwriter’s credits reveal the involvement of two Shreveport record store owners and label operators – Dee Marais and Stan Lewis.

17 LINDA BRANNON I'm Leavin’ (RAM 11829, 1958)
While a student at Fair Park High School, Brannon joined the scene around RAM Records and cut five 45s for the label. She also performed on the Louisiana Hayride.

18 THE BROTHERS Lazy Susan (Argo 5318, 1958)
The Mathis brothers moved to town to play country music on the Hayride. However, they had switched to rock and roll and allied themselves with Dale Hawkins by the time this song was cut. Later, they became two-thirds of the Newbeats, known for their song “Bread and Butter.”

19 BANNY PRICE There Goes The Girl (Jewel 733, 1964)
Price was active in the local rhythm & blues scene, and he’s one of the first Shreveporters to have a release on Stan Lewis’s Jewel record label. The songwriters’ credits are shared by two other musicians having ties to Shreveport – Dale Hawkins and Elgie Brown.

20 JIMMY & STAN Tahiti (Murco 1025, 1962)
These days Jimmy Johnson teaches guitar lessons. In the 1960s and ‘70s, his name appeared on a handful of Murco releases as a songwriter and producer. Here’s one that showcases him as a musician.

21 ALEX SNOOK JONES For My Worst (Blue Boy 1001, circa 1965)
A song from this local pianist’s only 45. Publishing credits reveal Dee Marais’ involvement.

22 THE IN-CROWD Nothing You Do (Ronn 1, 1966)
Local KEEL DJ Gene Kent managed this 1960s group. This song, from their only 45, was issued as the first record on Stan Lewis’s Ronn label. Their drummer, Steve Tuminello, is the nephew of A. J. Tuminello, who played drums for Dale Hawkins among others.

23 EDDIE “G” GILES AND THE JIVE 5 Eddy's Go-Go Train (Murco 1034, 1967)
One of Giles’s most up-tempo numbers. These days you can hear his gospel radio show weekday mornings on KOKA. On Sundays, he’s in the pulpit at Salem Missionary Baptist Church.

24 NORMA DRAGOO Nightmare (Custom Sound 142, circa 1970)
If you had the money, it seems Custom Sound would record and issue your record. Who knows the story behind this vanity release?

25 ABRAHAM Funky Spider And Scared Fly (Hy Sign 3514, 1973)
Abraham Ester recorded over half a dozen 45s for Dee Marais’ record labels. This was Ester’s last release and one of his funkiest.

26 TED TAYLOR Ghetto Disco (Alarm 117, 1977)
Taylor started recording in the mid-1950s in California, and by the mid-1960s he began cutting songs for Stan Lewis’s labels (Jewel and Ronn). In the mid-1970s, he connected with Alarm Records, a Shreveport label run by Jerry Strickland and Stewart Madison. Their label and studio were located at 3316 Line Avenue.

27 SMITH BROTHERS Pack Up (circa 1965)
A local gospel group’s demo acetate unearthed from the record collection of radio station KOKA.

28 W. K. (OLD MAN) HENDERSON Hello World (Hello World 001, 1930)
The first commercial recordings in Shreveport can be traced to an Okeh Records representative visiting the city in 1930. Here’s the fiery monologue they recorded by KWKH’s owner, W. K. Henderson. “Hello World...Dog-gone You!”

Sunday, May 20, 2018

SHREVEPORT MY HOME TOWN: OUR CITY’S SONGS (1923-1981)



SHREVEPORT MY HOME TOWN: OUR CITY’S SONGS (1923-1981)
Compiled in December 2006, liner notes revised May 2018.

Songs about Shreveport, songs recorded in Shreveport, songs by Shreveporters, songs on Shreveport record labels.

Listen online: https://www.mixcloud.com/shreveportsongs/2-shreveport-my-home-town-our-citys-songs-1923-1981/



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1 VIRGINIA LISTON - Shreveport Blues (Okeh 8122, 1923)
2 EDDIE AND SUGAR LOU'S HOTEL TYLER ORCHESTRA - K. W. K. H. Blues (Vocalion 1445, 1929)
3 SHREVEPORT HOME WRECKERS - Fence Breakin' Blues (Victor 23275, 1930)
4 LEON'S LONE STAR COWBOYS - I'm A Do Right Papa (Decca 5361, 1935)
5 THREE FIFTEEN AND HIS SQUARES - Saturday Night On Texas Avenue (Vocalion 3515, 1937)
6 THE RANGE RIDERS - The Range Riders Stomp (Vocalion 3579, 1937)
7 RICE BROTHERS GANG - You Are My Sunshine (Decca 5763, 1939)
8 NETTLE BROTHERS STRING BAND - Fannin’ Street Blues (Bluebird 8720, 1941)
9 ROY BROWN WITH BOB OGDEN & ORCH. - Good Rocking Tonight (DeLuxe 1093, 1947)
10 HANK WILLIAMS - Cool Water (1949)
11 RED SOVINE - Groovy Boy (MGM 10642, 1950)
12 "STICK-HORSE" HAMMOND - Highway 51 (JOB 105, 1950)
13 CLAUDE KING - Beer And Pinballs (Gotham 411, 1951)
14 WILLIE CASTON AND THE EVER READY GOSPEL SINGERS - When The Moon Goes Down (Abbott 149, 1953)
15 REV. UTAH SMITH - Two Wings (Checker 785, 1953)
16 JAMES WILSON AND THE JIMMIE-CATS - Wilson Blues No. 1 (RAM 15551, 1956)
17 MARGARET LEWIS - Shake A Leg (RAM 1611-9, 1959)
18 CARL BELEW - Cool Gator Shoes (Decca 9-30947, 1959)
19 ELGIE BROWN - Let Me Feel It (circa 1960)
20 BILL BUSH - I'm Waiting (Ronn 17, 1965)
21 THE PEERMONTS - Makin' Out - Part 1 (Murco 1030, 1967)
22 THE CHEQUES - To Stone (Boss Rock 101, 1967)
23 DORI GRAYSON - Try Love (Murco 1038, 1968)
24 LIGHTNIN' HOPKINS - Uncle Stan, The Hip Hit Record Man (Jewel 825, 1968)
25 THE ROGUE SHOW - Make Me Over Again (Paula 339, 1971)
26 ROAD RUNNERS - Every Man For Himself (Custom Sound 1023, circa 1971)
27 REUBEN BELL - Superjock (Alarm 111, 1976)
28 THE WEDGEHEADS - Shreveport Means Business (1981)
29 TERRY LEE - Shreveport My Home Town (PAMS, 1961)

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1 VIRGINIA LISTON - Shreveport Blues (Okeh 8122, 1923)
VL on vocals accompanied by Clarence Williams' Blue Five. She came from a vaudeville background, while Williams rose from Storyville pianist to successful music businessman through writing, publishing, and producing music in New York and Chicago.

2 EDDIE AND SUGAR LOU'S HOTEL TYLER ORCHESTRA - K. W. K. H. Blues (Vocalion 1445, 1929)
From Tyler, Texas, this group regularly traveled the 100 miles to Shreveport for performances broadcast on KWKH radio station.

3 SHREVEPORT HOME WRECKERS - Fence Breakin' Blues (Victor 23275, 1930)
Two Shreveport guitarists make up the SHW -- Oscar "Buddy" Woods and Ed "Dizzy Head" Schaffer. Both played on Jimmie Davis’s blues records in the early 1930s.

4 LEON'S LONE STAR COWBOYS - I'm A Do Right Papa (Decca 5361, 1935)
Leon Chappelear led the Lone Star Cowboys once Bob & Joe Attlesey left to form the Shelton Brothers. A friend of Jimmie Davis's, LC led a turbulent life going from policeman to Angola inmate to poundmaster to gas station worker. Until his tragic suicide, he consistently pursued a career in music.

5 THREE FIFTEEN AND HIS SQUARES - Saturday Night On Texas Avenue (Vocalion 3515, 1937)
Dave Bluntson (aka 315) on piano and vocals. A celebration of Shreveport's Texas Avenue -- a vibrant multicultural thoroughfare that doubled as United States Route 80, a transcontinental highway connecting Georgia to California.

6 THE RANGE RIDERS - The Range Riders Stomp (Vocalion 3579, 1937)
This group performed over radio stations KWKH and KTBS. Recorded at the same Hot Springs, Arkansas, session that 315 cut his song about Texas Avenue.

7 RICE BROTHERS GANG - You Are My Sunshine (Decca 5763, 1939)
RBG joined KWKH's Saturday Night Roundup (a precursor to the Louisiana Hayride) and performed on KTBS as the Southern Maid Donut Boys. This song was first recorded by the Pine Ridge Boys (from Atlanta, Georgia) in August 1939, then the RGB in September 1939, then Jimmie Davis purchased the rights to the song and recorded it in February 1940.

8 NETTLE BROTHERS STRING BAND - Fannin’ Street Blues (Bluebird 8720, 1941)
Prolific songwriter Bill Nettles hailed from Natchitoches, Louisiana. He moved to Shreveport where his band the Dixie Blue Boys performed on local radio stations (KRMD, KTBS) from about 1938 to 1946.

9 ROY BROWN WITH BOB OGDEN & ORCH. - Good Rocking Tonight (DeLuxe 1093, 1947)
RB said performing at Shreveport’s Palace Park nightclub was a formative experience where he developed his blues singing style. Following the release of this successful song, he continued to appear at the nightclub about twice a year until 1951.

10 HANK WILLIAMS - Cool Water (1949)
A song by the Sons of the Pioneers, HW cut this acetate disc demo recording at KWKH. While living in Shreveport/Bossier City from August 1948 to June 1949, he performed on a morning radio show and the Louisiana Hayride.

11 RED SOVINE - Groovy Boy (MGM 10642, 1950)
From 1948 to 1955, RS could be heard on KWKH performing his morning radio show and on the Louisiana Hayride. He composed this song about Ray "Groovy Boy" Bartlett, a KWKH rhythm and blues disc jockey and Hayride emcee.

12 "STICK-HORSE" HAMMOND - Highway 51 (JOB, 1950)
A resident of the nearby Taylortown community, Nathaniel Hammond’s nickname derives from his peg-leg. Recorded at KWKH and released by JOB -- Jimmie, Owens, and (Ray) Bartlett.

13 CLAUDE KING - Beer And Pinballs (Gotham 411, 1951)
Written by CK’s long-time collaborator and manager, Tillman Franks. King hailed from the nearby community of Keithville.

14 WILLIE CASTON AND THE EVER READY GOSPEL SINGERS - When The Moon Goes Down (Abbott 149, 1953)
Originally led by disc jockey Willie Caston, the ERGS formed in 1946 and were still performing as recent as 2006. For this song, Charles Graves provides lead vocals.

15 REV. UTAH SMITH - Two Wings (Checker 785, 1953)
Locals still remember this guitar evangelist, tent revival leader, and faith healer. An explosive blend of electric guitar and gospel. Born in the Cedar Grove neighborhood, he now rests in an unmarked grave at Carver Memorial Cemetery.

16 JAMES WILSON AND THE JIMMIE-CATS - Wilson Blues No. 1 (RAM 15551, 1956)
JW, a 16-year-old student at Fair Park High School, worked with Mira Smith of RAM Records to record one of Shreveport's first rockabilly records. James Burton on lead guitar.

17 MARGARET LEWIS - Shake A Leg (RAM 1611-9, 1959)
Migrating from West Texas, ML and her sister joined Dale Hawkins's band as backing vocalists. ML then worked with Mira Smith at RAM for a lengthy and fruitful relationship. Recorded at the RAM recording studio on Lakeshore Drive, this song appeared on her second 45.

18 CARL BELEW - Cool Gator Shoes (Decca 9-30947, 1959)
CB was part of the Louisiana Hayride from 1957 to 1959. This song was written by his regular songwriting collaborator, Tommy Blake, another local.

19 ELGIE BROWN - Let Me Feel It (circa 1960)
EB first appeared on the Shreveport rhythm and blues scene in the 1950s and led a band called the Downbeats. This track was recorded at the RAM studio.

20 BILL BUSH - I'm Waiting (Ronn 17, 1968)
At the time of this recording, BB was a 24-year-old sophomore at Centenary College, and his band performed nightly at the Town and Country Motor Hotel in Bossier City.

21 THE PEERMONTS - Makin' Out - Part 1 (Murco 1030, 1967)
From the first record by this band led by guitarist/songwriter Jimmy Johnson. He later operated the Peermont Recording Studio and taught guitar lessons.

22 THE CHEQUES - To Stone (Boss Rock 101, 1967)
Recorded in Shreveport and published by Bossier Music Co., this group’s members were stationed at the England Air Force Base (Alexandria, La.).

23 DORI GRAYSON - Try Love (Murco 1038, 1968)
One of the few local women to make rhythm and blues recordings, this comes from DG’s first release.

24 LIGHTNIN' HOPKINS - Uncle Stan, The Hip Hit Record Man (Jewel 825, 1968)
Stan Lewis released many records by bluesman LH. Here's a song named after the Record Man himself.

25 THE ROGUE SHOW - Make Me Over Again (Paula 339, 1971)
RS formed around 1968 and played dances/concerts at area high schools and colleges. This song comes from their first of three 45s.

26 ROAD RUNNERS - Every Man For Himself (Custom Sound 1023, 1969)
Bethune High School students recorded this funk instrumental at Sound City on Line Avenue. The same year, they played a NAACP soul music festival at the Municipal Auditorium.

27 REUBEN BELL - Superjock (Alarm 111, 1976)
About a decade into his recording career (usually known for melancholy ballads), RB delivered this upbeat tribute to disc jockeys.

28 THE WEDGEHEADS - Shreveport Means Business (1981)
Contenders for Shreveport's first punk band, they made a demo tape, but never issued a record. This song spoofs the city's motto at the time.

29 TERRY LEE - Shreveport My Home Town (PAMS, 1961)
Dallas production company PAMS churned out "My Hometown" songs for radio stations across the country. Presumably made for local station KEEL.

Monday, April 30, 2018

SHREVEPORT'S GONNA BE THE DEATH OF YOU: OUR CITY'S SONGS (1927-1972)



SHREVEPORT'S GONNA BE THE DEATH OF YOU: OUR CITY'S SONGS (1927-1972)
Compiled in December 2005, liner notes revised April 2018.

Songs about Shreveport, songs recorded in Shreveport, songs by Shreveporters, songs on Shreveport record labels.

Listen online https://www.mixcloud.com/shreveportsongs/shreveports-gonna-be-the-death-of-you-our-citys-songs-1927-1972/



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1 JELLY-ROLL MORTON'S RED HOT PEPPERS - Shreveport (Victor 21658, 1928)
2 LILLIAN GLINN - Shreveport Blues (Columbia 14519-D, 1929)
3 HENRY THOMAS "RAG TIME TEXAS" - Red River Blues (Vocalion 1137, 1927)
4 JIMMIE DAVIS - She's A Hum-Dinger (Victor 40286, 1930)
5 JESSE ("BABYFACE") THOMAS - Blue Goose Blues (Victor 38555, 1929)
6 JOE HARRIS AND KID WEST - Nobody's Business If I Do (1940)
7 LEAD BELLY - Fannin Street (Musicraft 225, 1939)
8 BUDDY JONES - Mean Old Lonesome Blues (Decca 5372, 1937)
9 TILLMAN FRANKS AND HIS RAINBOW BOYS - Hayride Boogie (Pacemaker 1011, 1951)
10 JIMMY LEE & JOHNNY MATHIS - If You Don't Somebody Else Will (Chess 4859, 1954)
11 ELVIS PRESLEY - Baby Let's Play House (1955)
12 TOMMY BLAKE WITH THE RHYTHM REBELS - Koolit (Buddy 107, 1956)
13 CHICO CHISM AND HIS JETANAIRS - Hot Tamales & Bar-B-Que (Clif 102, 1957)
14 BOB LUMAN - Red Hot (Imperial X8313, 1957)
15 T. V. SLIM AND HIS HEARTBREAKERS - Flatfoot Sam (Clif 103, 1957)
16 JOHNNY HORTON - Honky Tonk Hardwood Floor (Columbia 4-41110, 1957)
17 DALE HAWKINS - La-Do-Dada (Checker 900, 1958)
18 THE RUN-A-WAYS - Night Creature (Ram A-2090, 1960)
19 GRACE TENNESSEE AND THE AMERICAN SPIRITS - Pow Wow (WLS 1450, 1961)
20 THE UNIQUES - You Ain't Tuff (Paula 231, 1965)
21 TOM AND THE CATS - Good, Good Lovin' (Paula 253, 1966)
22 TOUSSAINT MCCALL - Shimmy (Ronn 3, 1967)
23 TOUSSAINT MCCALL - Nothing Takes The Place Of You (Ronn 3, 1967)
24 EDDY GILES - Losin' Boy (Murco 1031, 1967)
25 REUBEN BELL WITH THE CASANOVAS - It's Not That Easy (Murco 1035, 1967)
26 ANN ALFORD - Got To Get Me A Job (Hy-Sign 2111, 1972)
27 AFRICAN MUSIC MACHINE - Black Water Gold (Pearl) (Soul Power 109, 1972)
28 FIVE BY FIVE - 15 Going On 20 (Paula 326, 1970)
29 LEAD BELLY - Talk About Fannin Street (1948)


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1 JELLY-ROLL MORTON'S RED HOT PEPPERS - Shreveport (Victor 21658, 1928)
Hailing from New Orleans, pianist J-RM made this record after relocating to New York from his previous home in Chicago.

2 LILLIAN GLINN - Shreveport Blues (Columbia 14519-D, 1929)
LG, from Dallas, sings of her Shreveport man that she's ready to love "10 or 12 times a week."

3 HENRY THOMAS "RAG TIME TEXAS" - Red River Blues (Vocalion 1137, 1927)
The Red River, which borders Shreveport, is the theme for East Texas songster HT and his accompanying quills.

4 JIMMIE DAVIS - She's A Hum Dum Dinger (Victor 40286, 1930)
At the time of this recording, JD worked as a clerk in the criminal division of Shreveport’s city court. Guitar accompaniment provided by locals Oscar Woods and Ed Schaffer.

5 JESSE ("BABYFACE") THOMAS - Blue Goose Blues (Victor 38555, 1929)
Located at the intersection of Snow Street and Wilson Street Alley, the Blue Goose has been described as a pool hall, recreation parlor, domino hall, grocery store, and speakeasy. Raised in nearby Logansport, JT lived in Dallas, Oklahoma, Los Angeles, and points between before moving to Shreveport in 1957.

6 JOE HARRIS AND KID WEST - Nobody's Business If I Do (1940)
Guitarist JH and mandolin player KW performed this song for John Lomax when he visited town and made recordings for the Library of Congress’s Archive of American Folk Song.

7 LEAD BELLY - Fannin Street (Musicraft 225, 1939)
As described in this song...against his mother’s and sister's wishes, LB would hang around Fannin Street in Shreveport’s red light district. At the time of this recording, he was out on bail while serving an 8-month sentence at Rikers Island.

8 BUDDY JONES - Mean Old Lonesome Blues (Decca 5372, 1937)
Shreveport police officer BJ combines blues and country and yodelling.

9 TILLMAN FRANKS AND HIS RAINBOW BOYS - Hayride Boogie (Pacemaker 1011, 1951)
Webb Pierce on vocals. Pacemaker Records was operated by WP and Louisiana Hayride emcee Horace Logan.

10 JIMMY LEE & JOHNNY MATHIS - If You Don't Somebody Else Will (Chess 4859, 1954)
J&J joined the Louisiana Hayride and partnered with Tillman Franks, who became their manager and bass player. They recorded this song after hours at KWKH radio station. Recording supplied by record store owner Stan Lewis to Chicago’s Chess Records for their short-lived country music series.

11 ELVIS PRESLEY - Baby Let's Play House (1955)
EP began making weekly appearances on the Louisiana Hayride in October 1954. This live recording comes from August 20, 1955.

12 TOMMY BLAKE WITH THE RHYTHM REBELS - Koolit (Buddy 107, 1956)
TB’s first record. Released on Buddy Records based in nearby Marshall, Texas.

13 CHICO CHISM AND HIS JETANAIRS - Hot Tamales & Bar-B-Que (Clif 102, 1957)
Drummer/singer CC’s ode to food on Texas Avenue. He later moved to Chicago and played in Howlin’ Wolf’s band.

14 BOB LUMAN - Red Hot (Imperial X8313, 1957)
East Texan BL joined the Louisiana Hayride and hired teenage guitarist James Burton.

15 T. V. SLIM AND HIS HEARTBREAKERS - Flatfoot Sam (Clif 103, 1957)
Oscar Wills -- television repair shop employee and singer/guitarist. After this song appeared on local Clif Records, it was reissued by Checker Records, then re-recorded for release on their subsidiary Argo.

16 JOHNNY HORTON - Honky Tonk Hardwood Floor (Columbia 4-41110, 1957)
JH moved to Shreveport in 1951, became a regular on the Louisiana Hayride, and teamed up with bass player/manager Tillman Franks.

17 DALE HAWKINS - La-Do-Dada (Checker 900, 1958)
Stan’s Record Shop clerk DH recorded this after hours at KWKH radio station. The band on this recording includes Joe Osborne (guitar), DJ Fontana (drums), Mark Mathis (bass), Dean Mathis (piano), and Margaret Lewis (backup vocals).

18 THE RUN-A-WAYS - Night Creature (Ram A-2090, 1960)
From Dallas, Texas, this group also recorded as the Royal Jokers (Murco Records) and the Castaways (Capitol Records). Released by Mira Smith.

19 GRACE TENNESSEE AND THE AMERICAN SPIRITS - Pow Wow (WLS 1450, 1961)
Mira Smith: songwriter, guitarist, RAM Records label owner, RAM Record Shop owner, RAM Recording Studio owner, aka “Grace Tennessee” on this 45.

20 THE UNIQUES - You Ain't Tuff (Paula 231, 1965)
Hailing from Springhill, Louisiana, the Uniques featured Joe Stampley on vocals.

21 TOM AND THE CATS - Good, Good Lovin' (Paula 253, 1966)
Tom Colquitt’s band covers James Brown.

22 TOUSSAINT MCCALL - Shimmy (Ronn 3, 1967)
23 TOUSSAINT MCCALL - Nothing Takes The Place Of You (Ronn 3, 1967)
Hailing from Monroe, Louisiana, TM lip-synced this ballad in 1988 for John Waters’ movie “Hairspray.” Preceded by the instrumental b-side “Shimmy.”

24 EDDY GILES - Losin' Boy (Murco 1031, 1967)
EG’s first and most successful record. These days proclaiming, “I’m a winner now,” he’s pastor of Salem Missionary Baptist Church and disc jockey on KOKA.

25 REUBEN BELL WITH THE CASANOVAS - It's Not That Easy (Murco 1035, 1967)
Cedar Grove neighborhood resident RB’s first record...and a deep soul classic.

26 ANN ALFORD - Got To Get Me A Job (Hy-Sign 2111, 1972)
Mysterious AA cut this funk song for Dee Marais’ label.

27 AFRICAN MUSIC MACHINE - Black Water Gold (Pearl) (Soul Power 109, 1972)
Recorded locally at Sound City recording studio. Louis Villery (aka Rasheed) was the bandleader/bassist.

28 FIVE BY FIVE - 15 Going On 20 (Paula 326, 1970)
Lascivious rock and roll from Magnolia, Arkansas.

29 LEAD BELLY - Talk About Fannin Street (1948)
LB talks about his teenage experiences in Shreveport’s Saint Paul’s Bottoms neighborhood, a red light district from 1903 to 1917. In 1982, the area was renamed Ledbetter Heights in his honor.